Printed codes… trees and women.

Filed Under (work.BLOG) by WildFire on 08-12-2004

Programming.Tip-2004.1208-001

Save your work. Print your codes. Go out. (Away from computer... near a cafeteria or trees or something.)

Review them. No not the trees, the code.

Enjoy the breeze.

With the chirps of the bird as your soundtrack (not the usual techno/trance/industrial beats), sometimes you'll find more ways to tweak your codes (and even debug some problems) than when you are in front of the monitor.

Mark them. Note them for improvement later.

The printed codes can also be used for future references.

Program framework references.

Be careful though when you choose to review your codes in benches near trees.

Some trees are keen enough to recognize that the paper you are using came from them and would play weird tricks on you.

Remember Newton's Apple..?

Tradition has it that Newton was sitting under an apple tree when an apple fell on his head, and this made him understand that earthly and celestial gravitation are the same. This is an exaggeration of Newton's own tale about sitting by the window of his home (Woolsthorpe Manor) and watching an apple fall from a tree.

However it is now generally considered that even this story was invented by him in his later life, to try to show how clever he was at drawing inspiration from everyday events.

Link

Two many versions of the story, right?

But the actual story really was Isaac Newton was under the tree holding a pen and a paper formulating how to understand women.

He was near the Eureka moment where every flood of facts on how to understand the behavior and all of women (which could have been beneficial to generations and generations of men) were moving in into his brains and wisdom, when the tree intentionally let that apple fall on his head.

The women-related formulae/principles were completely forgotten and he ended up with boring gravitational-related stuff instead.

Too bad.

Actually that was only a mild trick. Just wait when trees start calling meteorites.